Valued Participant

Aspect ratio problem

 I have Spectrum Choice streaming TV service, using a Roku 2 Internet device. It works well; however, I find myself having to change the aspect ratio of the picture manually every time I change channels from an HD channel to an SD one (if I don't do this, the picture appears on my TV with two black bars at either side). I find this very annoying, as I watch programs on DTV subchannels of standard TV broadcast channels in the Cleveland area. These DTV subchannels all carry older TV shows from the 1950s through the '70s, which were filmed or taped in 4:3 aspect ratio. This means I must  change the aspect ratio setting of my TV every time I go from a channel having SD programs to one with HD programming, or vice-versa. Is there a way I can set my TV, or the Roku device, to automatically detect the aspect ratio of a given program and adjust the picture size accordingly, or is there a software update to address this issue? The Roku 2 does not seem to have any kind of provision for this, although the Roku 1 (I still have one) did have a setting for 4:3 aspect ratio in its main menu.

 

 

3 REPLIES
Proven Sharer

Re: Aspect ratio problem

Vertial bars on the left and right of the screen is the proper way to display a 4:3 image (those old TV shows) on a 16:9 screen without distorting the image.

 

What is your goal?  To crop off the top and bottom of the 4:3 image and zoom to fill a 16:9 screen(The top and bottom of the 4:3 image will be lost)?  Or is your goal to stretch the 4:3 image so that it fills a 16:9 screen (Things will look strecthed left-to-right), or flattened / squished)?

Valued Participant

Re: Aspect ratio problem

I am not concerned with what happens to the picture. I'm just trying to get the image to fill my TV screen. I have a 32-inch TV and don't like to see those black bars taking up several inches on either side of the screen. I am also concerned that these bars may eventually burn themselves into the sides of my TV screen, ruining the TV immediately. I used to work on old CRT (picture tube) televisions years ago, long before DTV; this often happened when a certain tube became weak or burned out, causing a bright white line to appear across the width of the screen. This line would burn itself into the screen if left on said screen any length of time, which would immediately ruin the tube.


@dstoffa wrote:

Vertial bars on the left and right of the screen is the proper way to display a 4:3 image (those old TV shows) on a 16:9 screen without distorting the image.

 

What is your goal?  To crop off the top and bottom of the 4:3 image and zoom to fill a 16:9 screen(The top and bottom of the 4:3 image will be lost)?  Or is your goal to stretch the 4:3 image so that it fills a 16:9 screen (Things will look strecthed left-to-right), or flattened / squished)?




 

Proven Sharer

Re: Aspect ratio problem


@jhs190 wrote:

I am not concerned with what happens to the picture. I'm just trying to get the image to fill my TV screen. I have a 32-inch TV and don't like to see those black bars taking up several inches on either side of the screen. I am also concerned that these bars may eventually burn themselves into the sides of my TV screen, ruining the TV immediately. I used to work on old CRT (picture tube) televisions years ago, long before DTV; this often happened when a certain tube became weak or burned out, causing a bright white line to appear across the width of the screen. This line would burn itself into the screen if left on said screen any length of time, which would immediately ruin the tube.




I own old video (arcade cabinet) games, and I am very familiar with screen burn in.  I can tell you that the monitors in my Joust and Sinistar are original, based on the burn in.  (No Pac Man maze on my games...)

 

CRTs and plasma TVs are more prone to burn in.  LCDs not so much.  LEDs have a higher risk than LCDs, but no-where are near as much as CRT and Plasma.  There is a difference between burn-in and image retention.

 

https://www.cnet.com/news/oled-screen-burn-in-what-you-need-to-know/

 

Samsung recommends you simply change the channel every once in a while.  Other reviewers advise no to worry about it.  Typical viewng patterns prevent it.  Having ESPN on in a bar 18 hours a day with the "bottom line" scrolling would cause a image burn / retention, but how many home users have ESPN on 24/7?

 

 

If you want to fill the screen at all times, it will be on you to change the settings on your TV.  Your video device (Roku, Cable Box, etc.) is always going to provide a signal as instructed in the stream, and that means it will show pillar bars on 4:3 content.