Helper

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

You could also use powerline adapters from the office to the back of the house and set up an access point there to cover your patio area.

 

 

Proven Sharer

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

You are paying for home wi-fi.  Your router will pay for itself in just over a year.

 

I currently use a TP-Link Archer C1200 router.  Bought it 2+ years ago.  Works like a charm.

 

This one is more current:

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-AC1750-Smart-WiFi-Router/dp/B079JD7F7G/

 

There are others, but this is what I have experience with.

 

They are very easy to set up.  I believe mine came with a "quick-setup" card.  In a nutshell, you will disconnect your current router, and power down your modem.  You will connect yoru PC to a LAN Port on the Router.  You will power on the Router (but do not connect its WAN port to your cable model unless told).  When you fire up your browser, I am sure you will be redirected to the router's home page, where you will set up the channel number, the passwords, etc.  (Defaults are in the box, or on a label on the underside of the router.)

 

If the router, by itself, does not solve your Wi-Fi problems, then you can buy an Access Point (or another wireless router, configured to be an access point and NOT a router), to extend your Wireless LAN.  You'd locate the access point where you have spotty coverage, and connect it to your routher via ethernet powerline adapters.

 

This kit gives you two adapters:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009ZRBXMI/

No need to fish cables.  You just plug them into outlets (preferable the same curcuit, then the same phase).  I too, use these with much success.

Contributor

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

@distoffa

I looked at link for Powerline..

So I would run an Ethernet cable from my router to a wall outlet Powerline device and that would allow any other 120V outlet in my house to receive internet via a 2nd ("slave") Powerline device. 

I would then run an Ethernet cable from the slave to, for instance, my laptop PC, and the laptop would be sort of happy.  Not really so happy because laptop has no 10-100-1000 speed network adapter, so laptop actually runs much faster internet  using the USB 5ghz dongle  on wi-fi. (100-200mbps as opposed to 20mbps on Ethernet) .

Also, my cell phones require wi-fi .  Seems like I read on internet that some Powerline "slave devices" actually can broadcast the signals via wi-fi which would make my cell phones and laptop happy,  So would I continue to use the Spectrum router to feed the Powerline master device and ALSO use the same router to simultaneously broadcast 2.4 and 5ghz to the front part of my house?  In other words, keep Spectrum router to broadcast both wi-fi bands as it does now, and also feed the Powerline devices, the slave of which would broadcast via wi-fi the same 2 network names  that the router is broadcasting?   

The 2 Powerline devices would be on the same home electric circuit panel in my garage but the 2 electrical outlets would not be on the same actual circuit breaker - problem?  

And let me know if I understand how Powerline would work.

Highlighted
Helper

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

If the slave doesn't have it's own wifi access point built in, you can connect a wifi access point to the slave via ethernet to run all the mobile devices.

 

Being on the same circuit breaker is ideal but not required. Most people use them on outlets on different circuit breakers without issue.

Proven Sharer

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

Before you go through all the work of adding a second WiFi access point,  get the first one in your Spectrum router working and set it up to connect to all of your devices.   Be sure all radios are locked to a specific channel, not in Auto or Scan modes.  Your current setup is Chnl 1 on 2.4 GHz and ?Ch 36 on the 5 GHz band.  Test each smartphone, computer,  and printer so you know they all can work together.  Write down all the settings or take pics on your phone of all the device setup menus. 

THEN you can experiment with a second WiFi access point (NOT an extender!) to add dual-band coverage in  more areas of your home.   When you add the second device, make the SSID (network name) the same on both units, but set the radios to different channels in both bands.  Example:  For your new AP2, use Ch4 on 2.4 GHz and 40 on 5 Ghz, so they don't interfere with each other. 

As far as selecting a router, buy an ugly one with several 6 to 8" tall external antennas and don't try to hide it behind your TV or other furniture.  The large print on the box should include MIMO, 802.11 ac, and Gigabit.  Much of the rest is marketing fluff. 

LGT
Contributor

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

@ccr67  Just trying to see if there is a simple solution. You would not believe how many people have their router on the floor behind the couch in a corner because that is where the outlet is. Is there a reason the modem and router needs to be hard wired next to the  PC?  Would a wi~fi connection to the PC not work?  I ask because if you are paying Spectrum for Wi-fi and you are not getting the coverage you need it should be their job to reposition the router. After all running coax is their main job and they know how to do it in almost any situation.   And they should do it for free since you are not getting the service you are paying for. 

 

Someone else on on here can correct me if I am wrong, but I thought the power output on most home wi-fi routers is limited to a certain level by the FCC.  You can’t have your neighbor broadcasting his wi-fi signal at 1000 watts.  Plus the return signal from your phone is limited to a certain level so you don’t have a microwave oven next to your head. Thus while your previous wi-fi worked it probably only broadcasted a tiny bit more power.  This would imply that maybe some repositioning of the wi-fi antenna might help.  If companies made wi-fi at many different power outputs range extenders would never be needed, people would just buy a more powerfull wi-fi transmitter.  

 

My opinion is that you might go through buying and returning a lot of routers before you find one with that little extra bit of power you are looking for. If you can’t get signal coverage, a range extender might still be your best bet.  There must be one made that can be configured to work with your setup. A second wi-fi access point would also work, but that would require you to run cable, which you have already nixed. 

Contributor

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

@karlbeckman

I assume you mean that I should 1st make your suggested channel changes to my existing Spectrum router and make sure that all my devices  - 2 phones (one 2.4 and one 5ghz) , 2 Vizio TV's on Roku sticks, 1 laptop using 5ghz wi-fi,  1 HP Envy 7155 printer (uses 2.4ghz but also broadcasts it's own 2.4 wi-fi signal for Direct Print (which I may have never used), 2 Sony Blu Ray players that can connect to wi-fi for Netflix or Amazon Prime video and a tiny HP PC that uses wireless keyboard and wireless mouse and connects with wi-fi - which  displays its monitor (via HDMI cable ) on a 46" Vizio TV  and a Ring Doorbell 2 on 2.4ghz..  All of the previous devices connect just fine to my existing router because all of them are located close enough to the router to get decent wi-fi.  If I change the router to use channels as suggested by you, I may have to reconnect my devices or maybe reboot the router and connect the devices - I don't know.

If you are suggesting based on me using the Powerline wi-fi idea - well, my son forwarded me a  page from the Netgear install manual that said the new device will create 2 new wi-fi  network names, not use the same names as those coming from the Spectrum router.   So your reply and the Spectrum manual seem to be saying different things, and that confuses me. 

Contributor

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

@LGT 

I still am thinking about the Netgear AC1750 router.  If it has as much or more transmit strength as my old TW/ Spectrum Technicolor cablemodemrouter (a single box) then that would solve my problem of wi-fi range.  I need signal to go only another 10-15' + 1 wall to cover my patio.  The Netgear router is about $89 on Amazon.  And I can send it back for refund if it does not do the job.  And Spectrum would cut my monthly bill by $5 if I don't need their router - which would pay for the Netgear router in 18 months.  I think Powerline would provide more speed and maybe more stability but would be more complicated than a router 1 for 1 replacement.    I believe my desktop  does have a wireless card but on Ethernet it is so fast (230Mbps) and stable.

Sharer

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

Keep in mind potential protocol/frequency limits. 5g band AC local transfers can potentially go to 866mb/s in the 1750 class or higher, depending on different factors. So in some cases it can match or even exceed what the Ethernet is doing (bottleneck may wind up being the internet plan, not the router).

Just one of those things you have to try to see how it performs. 9f the wifi works well enough for the PC, then you may have more flexibility... put it up higher, move it closer to the patio, etc. to get more range.
Contributor

Re: wi-fi and range extender - no internet

RAIST5150

I just now ordered the Netgear AC1750 from Amazon.  I will try it out and if it does not do what I need I'll just send it back to Amazon.  If it does work, my $5 monthly saving from Spectrum will pay for the new router in 18 months.

Yes, wi-fi 5ghz to my laptop USB wi-fi dongle is faster than Ethernet because the laptop has only a 10/100 network adapter.  On Ethernet, laptop download speed is maybe 30Mbps.  On 5ghz wifi it downloads at about 120-150Mbps (same download speed to my wife's iPhone7).  My ISP, Spectrum, internet plan is "Basic" at supposedly 200 Mbps, but I always get 220-240Mbps Ethernet to my desktop PC.  I downgraded internet from Spectrum's "Ultra" to save a few bucks.  Ultra gave me 350Mbps download speed, and Spectrum is the ONLY provider in my area that offers any speed at all.  Changing to a Spectrum plan from my old TW plan REQUIRED that Spectrum change my Technicolor cablemodemrouter to the separate modem and separate Spectrum router I have today.  The old and new hardware works perfectly EXCEPT that the new router broadcasts wi-fi a shorter distance than my old hardware did - thus my problem.