Rookie

Interested in buying my own modem

Currently the highest speeds in my area (SE Wisconsin) are 50mbps. Supposedly we are getting upgraded to 300mbps soon (anyone know when?)

What is the most reliable 300 mbps 16x4 modem I can buy that will also work well with my current 50mbps speed? I work from home and depend on consistently reliable internet. I want a modem that has firmware that has not been found to be buggy.

Also I am not interested in a modem router combo. I want to buy a separate router, so I would appreciate recommendations for that as well.
7 REPLIES 7
Browser

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

Time Warner has a list of approved modems. CLICK HERE 

I purchased the SMC D3CM1604 modem.  (Price usually runs in the $70 - $90 range which you will make back in short order when you avoid equipment rental charges from TWC)..  Just like you, I wanted just a modem and not a combination modem/router.  The cable modem is actually in the basement of my home and is connected by ethernet cable to my router which is in better location to serve my large home.   Having a separate router enables you to have the flexibility of making changes to your router in the future.  I purchased a hgh-end router which might be too pricey for some people -  ASUS RT-AC88U

From day 1, I have experienced absolutely NO problems with this combination.  SPECIAL NOTE:  TWC was completely new to my area (semi-rural) so after about 4 to 5 months of installing fiber, etc. I am connected to all new equipment (which I take to also mean the latest and greatest).

I have the 30/5 plan which I am paying $54.99/month.  I actually get 36 down and 6 up.

TWC has a website page that explains the activation process.  You can go there by CLICKING HERE

I
 am a regular person.  NOT AN EXPERT.  But also, my parents did not drop me on my head when I was baby.  Assuming your parents didn't drop you on your head - you will have no problems (that was a joke! - you can laugh now!)

Spectrum Employee

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

Seperated modem and router is better for the tech savvy customer, and unlike a certain Canadian ISP I know of, you can actually have your own 16 down by 4 up modem, and save $10/month (that's 2016 rate anyways for a rental).

 

For WiFi, there's so much variety I'll just say this:

  • Gigabit ethernet jacks
  • 802.11ac WiFi capability
  • Set up 2.4 GHz on 1, 6, or 11  and 20 MHz wide only.
  • Set up 5.0 GHz as 80 MHz wide
  • Find a firmware that has features you want (i.e.: Do you care more about parental controls or QoS prioritization for your LAN traffic?)
Spoiler
I've been able to pull 301 Mbps on WiFi on my Samsung Smartphone with this, 802.11ac for both router and smartphone, 4 bonded 20 MHz channels, 80 MHz wide total.  This is on 5.0 GHz.  Never set 2.4 GHz on anything other than 20 MHz wide, you're a total jerk if you do (and a fool too because you reduce your effective range, and cause adjacent inteference for yourself as well).  For speed, and newer devices, simply use 5.0 GHz WiFi, which all 802.11ac devices and routers will support.

The modem I'm using is a Motorola (now owned by Arris) SB6183, which even has it's own spectrum analyzer by going to 192.168.100.1:8080 (not as detailed as a real DSAM meter, but it's nifty to have).  I get more bandwidth than the quote 300 Mbps down by 20 Mbps up for most of the time, closer to my max provisioned speeds.

My postings on this site are my own, off-the-clock, and don’t necessarily represent TWC’s/Charter's strategies or opinions.
Expert

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

The approved modem list is only correct for the 16x4 and more ch modems

DO NOT BUY any 8x4 or 4x4 modems, they will no longer work properly on many TWC systems.

 The 4x4's are obsolete

 Spectrums internet plans60/6 and 100/6 include modems.

you also don't get blamed for signal problems if you use one of the cable co's modems...buy your own and it's always the modems fault.

 

Browser

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

Curious, you said to set 5ghz at 80 mhz bandwidth.  I went ahead and took your advice and changed my modem to 80.  Originally it was set to 20/40/80, I assume by default.

Can you briefly explain why that was your recommendation?

Rookie

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

If my area is supposedly slated to get 300mbps, why would they not offer a modem of that speed? Are you saying that I should not buy my own because once the merger is complete I won't have to pay a fee for the provided modem?
Highlighted
Rookie

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

I read that the 6183 had issues with firmware and ipv6. Was this resolved?
Spectrum Employee

Re: Interested in buying my own modem

I'm not recommending specific models or brands but yeah, I like the modem and wireless router (or switches) as seperated devices for many reasons.  The rental/leased all-in-ones are a perfect solution, on the other hand, for our non-tech savvy senior-citizen customers who really could use the benefit of us being able to manage their wifi remotely over the phone.   Sooo helpful for that.  Gateway modems (wireless router and modem in one) are plenty sufficient for appartments, duplexes, and the like.  They first became popular in highly urban areas like NYC, but were never intended for large houses (especially if the modem is in the basement).

 


@MsRaye wrote:
DO NOT BUY any 8x4 or 4x4 modems, they will no longer work properly on many TWC systems.

That's false; they do function at giving internet.  They just won't give the proper full speed (i.e.: if you have 300 Mbps down), essentially they're just capped out.  It really just depends on what internet bandwidth you are paying for.  Simply: need a modem that can support the speed.   That's the reason I wouldn't recommend buying anything other than a 8x4 or 16x4 DOCSIS 3.0, preferrably 16x4 if you don't mind spending the extra money.

(for leased, you need only take the old one to your local TWC store and we can swap it)

 

My opinion in more detail, if y'all care to hear it:

 

Spoiler

While I would agree that 4x4 is older tech, there's still roughly third of all internet modems out there that are DOCSIS 2.0 (leased or owned).  I wouldn't call it obsolete.

We all need to start using DOCSIS 3.0 first, then can worry about going from 4x4 to 16x4.  One thing at a time.  Heck there are still customers out there using DOCSIS 1.1 modems.  Seriously, 1.1.  I help swap out several of those month, like first-gen DOCSIS 2.0's like Motorola SB5100's. 

 

Also, 32x8 (32 down, 8 up, for channels that the modem can lock onto), like the SB6190, are not really necessary yet.  Maybe someday in the future, but upgrading the upstream channels from 4 to 8 is a major overhaul, y'all have no idea lol.  Even going from 16 to 32 on downstream channels will likely mean it will be required to have to have a box of some kind for every TV (even if just a DTA).  But again, this is all pretty far down the road at this point.

 

 


@Mose wrote:
I read that the 6183 had issues with firmware and ipv6. Was this resolved?

The only issue wasn't that they didn't work for internet (they worked just fine for internet), it was with the IPv6 specifically, for those who needed IPv6 each jump of the path for specific applications.  I believe the community head admin here (PhilB) said there was a fix being implemented, and this was a fair while ago.  I believe it's fixed, but don't quote me on that, I'm not a member of the TOC (i.e.: headend and hub techs, and other network engineers that I don't know much about personally, nor do I really need to).

 

 

 

 

My postings on this site are my own, off-the-clock, and don’t necessarily represent TWC’s/Charter's strategies or opinions.