Rookie

Installing yourself

I have digital cable therefore I have a cable box. Now i added internet and home phone. I have bought a modem/router that is wireless and have the phone modem. How do i hook all 3 up, there is no video on how to do all 3 together
3 REPLIES 3
Participant

Re: Installing yourself

it is not easy, call c/s and pay installation fee

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Spectrum Employee

Re: Installing yourself

I'll answer this a bit more at length, for people who are the DIY (do-it-yourself) type of personality.

 

In this case, you need 3 coaxial connection endpoints or outlets with sufficient two-way signal power on each.  If you have only 1 outlet, you'd need to use a splitter (or a no-loss-no-gain amp) to share the signal.

 

One can check for "sufficient signal levels" with one's internet modem rather easily

Spoiler
when it's online & running and connected to a computer, you can typically type 192.168.100.1 into your internet browser's URL bar to see the signal level summary.  Some modem brands may be different about that, but that's for most

I've said this before in numerous places on these forums, but to to keep it short you must have at least this:

For receive/forward/downstream, between -10 and +10, and ideally between -8 and +8 dBmV.

For transmit/return/upstream, between +30 and +50 is ideal, but must be below +52 dBmV.

 

They should be good quality connectors too, as leaky, cheap fittings or wire can cause issues.  No hex-crimp fittings.  No twist-on fittings. No loosely attached fittings. No quick-connect fittings.  Never ever for a digital RF service, like your TWC/Charter service.

Spoiler
note: those work well enough for when it's an analog signal and the quality of the signal isn't paramount.  Push-on connectors are actually great for quick testing (i.e.: if trying to tone out a wire, or check continuity), but not for sensitive stuff like internet connectivity or digtial TV. You'll see them in houses where the builder who wired the house tried to cut costs by cutting corners on quality connectors & used cheaper RG-59 wiring (instead of proper RG-6 or RG-6-Quad-Shielded). 

Only use good quality compression fittings and good barrels for the wall outlets.  (please note I'm not picking on specific brands here, just giving real-world examples that you can see pictures of.  It's hard to talk about the terminology without giving pictures.)

 

If you're making your own fittings, I've found this little tool is perfect for tri-shield coaxial wire, you just spin it around a few times until the crunching sound stops (that's the metal braids being cut) and then pull.  It's not an official tool, just my own personal favorite (although it doesn't work well on RG-59 or RG-6QS, and of course won't do RG-11)

 

If you cannot get sufficient signals despite your effort, then this is one DIY project you cannot do without help from a professional.  Call us and schedule an appointment.

 

But anyways I thought I'd drop a few gems of golden advice for any of y'all DIY'ers out there, or if you're just curious if your home could use some good stuff.  As  home owner it's a good idea to know what your wiring is like in your home.

My postings on this site are my own, off-the-clock, and don’t necessarily represent TWC’s/Charter's strategies or opinions.
Proven Sharer

Re: Installing yourself


@Vickyjo wrote:
I have digital cable therefore I have a cable box. Now i added internet and home phone. I have bought a modem/router that is wireless and have the phone modem. How do i hook all 3 up, there is no video on how to do all 3 together

You have already  bought yourself a problem:  The router you purchased with both a VOIP interface and WiFi router can only be used on the TWC network for ONE of those functions, not both.  The simple reason is that the data stream for VOIP calls uses a different IP address scheme than the data for internet service or for cable TV video and audio.

TWC can't provision your modem device to have two separate addresses.  When you buy TWC phone service TWC includes the required VOIP modem in that monthly charge.  From there you can provide your own separate internet modem with WiFi router built in or as a separate box (recommended), or TWC will provide a combo unit for a monthly fee.