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Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

We do have a promo rate.  My wife negotiated it over a couple long phone calls.   I think we're saving about $30/month, or that's what it was when she got it -- not sure how it compares to new Spectrum bundles.

 

Thanks again for all your help.

Valued Participant

Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

You're Welcome.

100mbps,  select,  and phone at standard rates would probably be:

$55 Internet ($10 discount)
$65 tv 

$20 phone ($10 discount)

$7 box (was $6 until this month)

or ($2 cable card)

$8.85 broadcast fee (was 7.50 until this month)

$0 modem

$10 or so extra fees and taxes

Around $165 .  They should still give out a free box with the switch since your area just went digital

I know nothing about dvr's so i don't know how those would alter the price if you need any of those.

or they actually give you a new rate.   


Proven Sharer

Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?


@BataviaJim wrote:

 

  Your Roku suggestions are intriguing.  Both bedroom TVs are  wi-fi enabled and can access Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, & VUDU.  We have a Netflix account so can watch those shows, but at bedtime we mostly want to watch national news and live sports, not available on those services.  Would Roku give us something more than that?  Are you suggesting we can watch Spectrum channels through a Roku stick, without any converter box?

 

Two new questions:   why a hard-wired Roku?  (very difficult logistically in our house), and how would I use a cable card?

 



1.  Roku essentially makes a dumbTV a smartTV, and then some.  You download streaming channels (apps) to the Roku, and watch programming.  There are Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon channels, plus other channels like the NBC Sports Channel, FX Now, FOX NOW, CBS All Access, etc.  But for Spectrum customers, there is the Spectrum Channel, where you can watch video programming you subscribe to.  It essentially replaces your cable box (and you can watch all those other things, too).  The low-end models run about $50.  The upper end $100.

 

2.  I recommend hard-wired (RJ45 ethernet) Rokus simply becuase hard-wired devices work better / faster.  I always recommend people make use of powerline ethernet adapters to extend their hard-wired LAN when added devices in the home that "stay put" like a TV or a desktop computer instead of putting yet one more device on the Wireless.

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Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

That's only a few dollars more than we're paying now.

 

However there's a new development.  Based on your previous comment about Samsung, I was able to find and download the Spectrum app.  After authenticating, the TV gets all our Spectrum channels.  It's not perfect:  

  •       The TV has to be on for about 5 minutes before the app will load.
  •       Navigation response is slow, as you predicted over Wi-Fi. 
  •      The channel numbers don't work, only the channel "up/down".  So to get from channel 2 to channel 80 I'd have to press the "up" button 78 times.   It takes a few seconds each time, so that's cumbersome.  But there's a "favorites" function so we can add our most-watched channels and use that to maneuver.

We'll have to use it for a while to see how it works out, but my initial impression is that it will suffice, and the cost is right.

 

Thanks once again for your help.  I had no idea about this approach and likely wouldn't have discovered it otherwise.

Expert

Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

All digital simply means that there are no analog channels or clear qam for a tv sets tuner to receive. Has nothing to obsolete out DTA's to use full 2 way cable boxes...

DTA's are a cheap one way digital tunered cable box, they don't adapt anything.

 

Proven Sharer

Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?


@BataviaJim wrote:

 

However there's a new development.  Based on your previous comment about Samsung, I was able to find and download the Spectrum app.  After authenticating, the TV gets all our Spectrum channels.  It's not perfect:  

  •       The TV has to be on for about 5 minutes before the app will load.
  •       Navigation response is slow, as you predicted over Wi-Fi. 
  •      The channel numbers don't work, only the channel "up/down".  So to get from channel 2 to channel 80 I'd have to press the "up" button 78 times.   It takes a few seconds each time, so that's cumbersome.  But there's a "favorites" function so we can add our most-watched channels and use that to maneuver.

With the Spectrum Channel on Roku, you can get a channel guide, from which makes it much easier to select a program to watch.

 

in addition, on Spectrum for Roku, your guide will only show the channels you subscribe to, so no need to scroll through channels you don't get.

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Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

The Spectrum app does include a channel guide but it's slow and you have to go one channel at a time -- can't use the remote's number pad to jump to a specific channel.  I wonder if the number pad would work with the Roku guide; that alone might be worth the $40 or so that it costs.  I also wonder if it would be any faster, although probably not because I'd guess the Wi-Fi connection is the bottleneck.

 

Thanks.

Helper

Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?


@BataviaJim wrote:

The Spectrum app does include a channel guide but it's slow and you have to go one channel at a time -- can't use the remote's number pad to jump to a specific channel.  I wonder if the number pad would work with the Roku guide; that alone might be worth the $40 or so that it costs.  I also wonder if it would be any faster, although probably not because I'd guess the Wi-Fi connection is the bottleneck.

 

Thanks.


The number pad does not direct tune to a channel on the Spectrum TV app on a Roku...at least not in my experience. I can sort by channel #, name, or genre, or favorites. Also, the app on my Roku (all 3 in my house) is very responsive and takes seconds to start up, not the 5 minutes you describe on the Samsung. All of my Rokus are wireless too as they are in spare rooms and the garage where I haven't run ethernet yet. 

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Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

Thanks for the info.  I was hoping the channel numbers would work but I'm not surprised they don't.  It might be worth it anyway just for the response improvement.  I see there are at least 5 different Roku products -- which do you have that respond that fast?

Helper

Re: Digital Receiver vs. Digital Transport Adapter (DTA) ?

I have the current Roku Streaming Stick, an older Roku Express, and a Sharp 55" Roku TV.