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Rookie

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

MsRaye,

I understand that MoCA has nothing to do with wireless. It is MoCA that is used for wireless extenders like the ActionTec WCB3000N. I switched from Frontier/Verizon to TWC/Spectrum for the exact same services: 1 DVR, 1 standard box, and internet. With Frontier/Verizon MoCA worked just fine and my ActionTec device connected to the coax and duplicated my wireless signal/SSID to the other side of the house, opposite of the router. No interference, no issues. Now that I have TWC/Spectrum this isn't an option. Spectrum installers even left all the filters on the coax lines that I checked today.  Why would Spectrum even spend the money on routers that have the MoCA feature on them if they aren't going to have the functionality available?

Rookie

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

I'm still struggling with this issue, I have spent hours on the phone with tech support in an effort to solve this, two seperate techs have switched my modem out of bridge mode and assured me that my problem was solved. It is not, the 3 ethernet ports are still blocked. I still have only one of four ports working. There may be hope on the horizon, the last tech told me that my modem is outdated and I should have Spectrum replace it. I'll try that on Monday when they open. I just read the reply above about MOCA from another subscriber describing a similar issue with his Moca extender, He also seems to beleive that Spectrum has caused this problem. Can anyone enlighten us. I have gotten different explanations from various Spectrum employees, all contradictory. Can someone answer this basic question "Has my ability to use my Moca extender been changed or tampered with in the transition from Time Warner ownership to Spectrum's ownership?" One of the techs I was working asked me when and why did I switch my modem to bridge mode,....I never did, and even if I wanted to, I wouldn't know how.

Rookie

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

MsRaye, I have just read your reply to jcox383 and it does not shed any light on the issue. I too understand that MoCA has nothing to do with wireless , MoCA is simply a service extender similar to the power line extenders but much more reliable and efficient. All of the MoCA equipment and wiring belong to me, none of it is provided by Spectrum, I understand that it is my responsibility to maintain it, not Spectrum's.  "

"You need proper moca blocking filters before the modem and before the outside line, they must be marked 1 gHz low pass.

You can take an ethernet to moca  converter, plug it into one of the lan ports on the router and it will send moca thru coax, provided it's all wired right.

Sorry but it's not a job for beginners. Severe interference will occur if it's wrong."

       This has not been my experience, I installed this MoCA system myself (no technical  training whatever) and it has worked flawlessly fot years, I did not need filters and suffered no "severe interferience" at all, I wouldn't know a  "1 gHz low pass" if I tripped over it. This is not idle chatter or a mere inconvenience for me, my livelyhood depends on a fast reliable network, this is why i have spent hours on the phone with Spectrum support and why I am vigorously pursuing  solutions on this forum.
   Perhaps a new modem will solve this issue but I honestly do not have much hope that it will.  I have a private wiring technician coming to my office today to troubleshoot all my coaxial cables to see if there is a problem within  my own wiring network. It may turn out that this is not a Spectrum related problem at all, I just need a solution. All of the tech support people I have dealt with have been very courteous and have tried hard to help with this problem. My reason for suspecting it is, is because some Spectrum workers have told me that it is because I do not subscribe to Spectrum's wireless add on.  If I do get this sorted out, I will certainly post the solution on this forum.
Expert

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

Your installation without filters is the exact reason why TWC/ Spectrum won't support it. You are sending trash out onto the street and interfering with other customers on the node.

There must be a 1 gHz LP filter installed after the grounding block to both prevent egress and to reflect moca down all splitter ports, but probably not the one the modem is connected to. 

You cannot have any whole house DVR's and moca on the same coax.

 The other reason TWC/ Spectrum doesn't support it  is beacause it allows neighbors to steal internet and streaming tv and is a security risk  for you as it allows neighbors on the Intranet/ lan side of your network without any firewall. They could have a virus that will attack some/ all your devices.

 

 To the other poster, if you have a modem combo with one active port,it's still in bridged mode. Get a different modem combo and don't fool with the settings... It's also possible ports are blown out from a lightning hit, lol.

If it is in bridged mode, both wireless and moca won't work as it's no longer a router, just a dumb modem.  If you want  moca, buy one more moca adapter and connect it to one of the working lan ports on the new modem combo.  You also need to reinstall/ reset all moca devices as the configuration has changed.

 

Proven Sharer

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???


@jcox383 wrote:

 

I understand that MoCA has nothing to do with wireless. It is MoCA that is used for wireless extenders like the ActionTec WCB3000N. I switched from Frontier/Verizon to TWC/Spectrum for the exact same services: 1 DVR, 1 standard box, and internet. With Frontier/Verizon MoCA worked just fine and my ActionTec device connected to the coax and duplicated my wireless signal/SSID to the other side of the house, opposite of the router. No interference, no issues. Now that I have TWC/Spectrum this isn't an option. Spectrum installers even left all the filters on the coax lines that I checked today.  Why would Spectrum even spend the money on routers that have the MoCA feature on them if they aren't going to have the functionality available?


Verizon / Frontier used fiber to the home, so there would be no blow back to the neighborhood node from using MoCA in your home, if I understand how these things work correctly.  It was easier with Verizon / Frontier.  Not so much with old-school cable television.

 

Since most cable companies use coax downstream of the head-end to wire a neighborhood, MoCA must only use spectrum above 1 GHz, and you must isolate your home from the cable company and the rest of your neighborhood with a 1 GHZ low-pass filter (to allow two-way communication at frequencies below 1 GHz).

Proven Sharer

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???


@dryfly wrote:

       This has not been my experience, I installed this MoCA system myself (no technical  training whatever) and it has worked flawlessly fot years, I did not need filters and suffered no "severe interferience" at all, I wouldn't know a  "1 gHz low pass" if I tripped over it. This is not idle chatter or a mere inconvenience for me, my livelyhood depends on a fast reliable network, this is why i have spent hours on the phone with Spectrum support and why I am vigorously pursuing  solutions on this forum.
   Perhaps a new modem will solve this issue but I honestly do not have much hope that it will.  I have a private wiring technician coming to my office today to troubleshoot all my coaxial cables to see if there is a problem within  my own wiring network. It may turn out that this is not a Spectrum related problem at all, I just need a solution. All of the tech support people I have dealt with have been very courteous and have tried hard to help with this problem. My reason for suspecting it is, is because some Spectrum workers have told me that it is because I do not subscribe to Spectrum's wireless add on.  If I do get this sorted out, I will certainly post the solution on this forum.

What service did you have before Spectrum?

Expert

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

The FIOS providers have a modem/router combo that has a single ethernet and a single coaxial output. The coaxial output is a moca interface signal and is DHCP enabled NAT just like the single ethernet port that would need an ethernet switch to distribute it to ethernet devices or a bridged accesss point for wireless.

The moca port was to feed an existing coaxial inhouse network and required moca to ethernet adapters wherever needed. Moca is slower than ethernet and has distribution issues on old rg59 and 500 mHz splitters  as it operates in the 1200-1500 mHz region.,

Since they had fiber outside the house, there was not an interference/ theft issue between neighbors.

 

Expert

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

Here is what the OP had... an ONT box that they used the MOCA output instead of ethernet:

weg14s

Expert

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

Here's a different MFG's.

MOCAbox

Expert

Re: Has Spectrum disabled my MOCA???

none of the above show the needed 1gHz low pass "moca" filter and splitter changes required to add in or change to a cable tv system.  It was not designed to work that way, TWC & Spectrum do not support it either.

 You need to contact a local home a/v contractor if you can't do it yourself.

 Cable QAM 256 levels are critical and none of the above diagrams will support cable tv and moca as there's imprperly placed and lossy splitters feeding various rooms.

 There is also a 4 port moca output ONT that simply has an internal 4 way splitter. It too was not designed and won't work by replacing it with a 4 way splitter  You need a router and a moca adapter as well as a moca injection splitter to diplex cable tv and moca on the same coax and probably a special moca & Cable distribution amplifier if there's more than 3 devices on the coax side.

It also has a max speed of 100 megs if everything is installed correctly.