Expert

Re: Add-on wireless router question

I don't see an option to change that router from NAT to bridged mode... Google it's model and bridged, maybe you'll find the parameters...

The simple setup covers the common NAT mode...

 

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Re: Add-on wireless router question

MsRaye,

I bridged the modem and the router connected to the internet.  I'm getting the same download speed through the router as I did with  a direct connection to the modem, so I'm a happy camper.

Thank you so much for your help.

Don

Participant

Re: Add-on wireless router question

It looks like you've solved the practical issue of how to gain wifi without paying TWC for it, but you may have actually exposed yourself to bigger security headaches by using an 8 year old D-Link as your main router rather than the newer and more secure Arris.

 

In the event you decide to do this in the manner that I would consider the correct way to give yourself wifi access without compromising or foregoing the better and newer router,   the answer is contained at pages 12 and 13 of your D-Link 600 user manual.    What you had originally proposed was to essentially use the D-Link as a "access point", which means that your D-Link would only provide the minimal wifi access you wanted, but you'd still connect other hard-wired devices directly to the Arris.  

 

To set things up this way, you need to turn off the DHCP server built into the firmware on the D-Link (and not the Arris) and make a few other changes in the D-Link's settings so that you can simply plug the D-Link into one of the LAN ports on the Arris, and gain internet access through the Arris DG to the internet. 

 

Here are the instructions from the D-Link manual on how to do this, step by step: 

 

If you are connecting the D-Link router to another router to use as a wireless access point and/or switch, you will have to do the following before connecting the router to your network:

• Disable UPnP™

• Disable DHCP

• Change the LAN IP address to an available address on your network.

 

The LAN ports on the router cannot accept a DHCP address from your other router. To connect to another router, please follow the steps below:

 

1. Plug the power into the router. Connect one of your computers to the router (LAN port) using an Ethernet cable. Make sure your IP address on the computer is 192.168.0.xxx (where xxx is between 2 and 254). Please see the Networking Basics section for more information. If you need to change the settings, write down your existing settings before making any changes. In most cases, your computer should be set to receive an IP address automatically in which case you will not have to do anything to your computer.

 

2. Open a web browser and enter http://192.168.0.1 and press Enter. When the login window appears, set the user name to admin and leave the password box empty. Click OK to continue.

 

3. Click on Advanced and then click Advanced฀ Network. Uncheck the Enable UPnP checkbox. Click Save฀ Settings to continue.

 

4. Click Setup and then click Network Settings. Uncheck the Enable DHCP Server server checkbox. Click Save฀ Settings to continue.

 

5. Under Router Settings, enter an available IP address and the subnet mask of your network. Click Save฀ Settings to save your settings. Use this new IP address to access the coniguration utility of the router in the future. Close the browser and change your computer’s IP settings back to the original values as in Step 1. Connect to Another Router D-Link DIR-600 User Manual 13 Section 2 - Installation

 

6. Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the router and reconnect your computer to your network.

 

7. Connect an Ethernet cable in one of the LAN ports of the router and connect it to your other router. Do not plug anything into the WAN port of the D-Link router.

 

8. You may now use the other three LAN ports to connect other Ethernet devices and computers. To conigure your wireless network, open a web browser and enter the IP address you assigned to the router. Refer to the Configuration and Wireless Security sections for more information on setting up your wireless network.

 

The manual is located at this link: http://www.dlink.com/-/media/Consumer_Products/DIR/DIR%20600/Manual/DIR_600_B_2_Manual_EN_UK.pdf

 

Frankly, I would recommend that you set things up using your old D-Link as an AP rather than as your router.   The Arris DG1670 is a far better router than the old D-Link, and as you noted in your original post, all you want to do with the D-Link is download the occasional book to an e-reader, not to surf the web, stream video or do large file transfers.  By setting "bridge" mode in the Arris,  you've essentially turned off all the routing functions and it's now just acting as a "dumb" pass-through cable modem, and your 8 year old D-Link is handling all of the routing functions. 

 

Your newer, leased cable modem, the Arris DG is by far a better and more capable router, and likely far more secure as well,  than is the now almost 9-year old D-Link (first released in early 2008).   If you haven't updated the firmware on the D-Link, you probably should as a lot of exploits and other defects have been noted and corrected over time that the original firmware likely exposed and which still leaves you vulnerable (at least more vulnerable than you would be by using the Arris as your router).    

 

If you really want to use the Arris DG in Bridge Mode (i.e., just as a cable modem) with a different wireless router,  you really should buy a newer, better and more recently released router, one that has better and far more secure routing and wireless capabilities.    If you want suggestions on what to look for, check out http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/

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Re: Add-on wireless router question

Jegesq,

Thank you for the detailed explanation.  I will try that.  My router looks slightly different than the one in the manual.  Maybe that's because it is a 600L.  But the menus look the same.  I don't recall getting a manual with mine.  If I did, it's long gone.  Thank you for the link.  I have updated my firmware to the latest rev.  As you can tell, I'm not overly network savvy.

Don

Expert

Re: Add-on wireless router question

As long as you turn off wan side administration, wireless administration, WPS and change the  login &password, the router shouldn't be hackable from the wan or wireless side.

 As for the modem in bridge, hopefully it stays that way. if TWC sends it a fw upgrade, it will have NAT routing turned back on.

 

 

Participant

Re: Add-on wireless router question

Ms. Raye: 

 

Ahh, would that it were so (re: free from hacks simply by turning off "wan side administration").  With all due respect, you don't know a lot about hacking modems, backdoors and exploits in firmware, do you? 

 

 

Expert

Re: Add-on wireless router question

Modems pretty much can't be hacked. When the cable co senses an issue they resend the provisioning file. It's why you can't hack them to increase the speed for very long.

As for routers, the only hacks are the WPS accessing all lan side devices from a wireless one.

Anything wan related has been due to customers failing to change the default login and passwords.

 I would much more be worried about an all in one combo, supplied by the cable co geting hacked than a coam seperate router behind a modem as the cable co's use common logins to access all their  gear.

 

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Re: Add-on wireless router question

I can't imagine why anyone would want to hack my computer.  But, the thought that TWC may upgrade their modem firmware and shut me down for a time makes me think that making the router an access point is the better plan.  I wonder whether I will have to re-activate the Arris when I do a hard reset on it.

 

If I make the router an access point, I guess one way to make the WiFi  100% secure is to just unplug the cable or power it down when I'm not using it.

 

Thanks again,

 

Don

Participant

Re: Add-on wireless router question

To make the D-Link an AP, you don't need to do anything to your Arris.  Nothing.   Just get the IP and gateway info from the admin page on the Arris, note that info, and follow the directions to change the D-Link from a wireless router to an Access Point using the info you got from the Arris.   Make all the appropriate changes on your D-Link, then plug it into the Arris via a LAN port, and voila', you now have a wifi access point to wirelessly transfer books and other downloaded material to your e-reader, and you still have a newer router, with newer IP tables, better and more updated security and firmware, a more robust firewall than your  8 year old D-Link, and thus, you have what you originally set out to achieve.   

 

One last caveat:  Be sure to use turn on the highest level of wifi security that is available on the D-link and password protect it so that you're not running a completely open and unprotected wifi channel, which can provide unimpeded access into your network from others within range of the D-Link (e.g., neighbors) who you don't want snooping around your system. 

 

And since it's pretty far off-topic, I'm not going to respond further to Ms. Raye's remarks that routers and modems are purportedly not vulnerable to attacks or exploits, or that "the cable company" can somehow prevent such hacks. If that's what she wants to believe, good for her,  but it's a fantasy.   And it's really not the point of this thread to argue about that, so so  I'll just let it pass. 

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Re: Add-on wireless router question

jegesq,

 

Since I've set the Arris to bridge mode, I figured I'd have to do a reset in order to re-configure it.

 

I doubt whether any of my neighbors have the technical smarts or interest in hacking my network, but thanks for the advice.  I will try to make it secure.

 

Don