Rookie

Snowy channels on HDTV connected to inner wall connection

The cable company in our town is "substandard" overlooking the obvious like frayed wires to defective boxes over the years, even claiming we have "too much stuff" hooked up to the 7, yes 7, connections that worked great until they "upgraded",  so I hate to call them, so...can anybody tell me what issues could be happening with a cable hookup on an inner wall?  For years now, we have had several channels barely come in, particularly late at night only on that hookup, and I have tested it on multiple tvs.  After reading some postings here, I thought I'd do a couple more tests and found that the picture on these multiple tvs work fine when I connect it to other connections in the house via a splitter (that are still hooked up...they actually disconnected some due to having "too much stuff").  To me this isolates the problem to this particular wall connection.  I'm sure if I call them they will just do like they always do and try to find some other excuse so they can claim it is my fault and charge me their ridiculous service call and not fix the problem.  Can anyone tell me if there is an easy fix for this?  Thanks for any input.

5 REPLIES
Expert

Re: Snowy channels on HDTV connected to inner wall connection

Replace that line and splitter.. But, your direct , NTSC analog, boxless connections aren't long for the world, as by the end of the year, all areas will be encrypted qam and require cable boxes.

 And if you have more than 3 devices, the proper amplifier is required and the modem on the first 2 way splitter before the amp if it doesn't have a voip port.

Where are you?

 

Rookie

Re: Snowy channels on HDTV connected to inner wall connection

Well, that s*cks!  Guess I'm really going to have to research alternatives now.  Any suggestions?  We are in Wichita Falls, TX.  There is an "amp"...I presume that is what it is, plugged in in our utility room with a cable attached leading up to the attic.  I guess that goes to a splitter like you are describing.  Roadrunner has always been excellent though the cheap modem they provide is over 10 years old...I know if I bought my own that service "suddenly" would deterioate so I keep paying that stupid rental fee every month.

Established Sharer

Re: Snowy channels on HDTV connected to inner wall connection


SickofTWC wrote:

Well, that s*cks!  Guess I'm really going to have to research alternatives now.  Any suggestions?  We are in Wichita Falls, TX.  There is an "amp"...I presume that is what it is, plugged in in our utility room with a cable attached leading up to the attic.  I guess that goes to a splitter like you are describing.  Roadrunner has always been excellent though the cheap assed modem they provide is over 10 years old...I know if I bought my own that service "suddenly" would deterioate so I keep paying that stupid rental fee every month.


With NTSC going away, and encrypted QAM being the future (if not the present), you will need a cable box for every television in the house.

 

There are some alternatives you can look into.

 

The first is using the television itself to receive cable programming.  If your TV's are Samsung Smart TV's (but not too new), you can download the SprectrumTV App and use the App to watch programming.

 

The second option, and the one I recomment, is to buy a Roku for each television you wish to receive cable programming on.  The Spectrum "Channel" can be downloaded from the Roku store, and you can use the Roku as your "cable box".  Although the entry models are less than $50, the ones with wired ethernet ports are just under $100, and are the ones I would recommend.  You want to use hard-wired connections for this service, not wifi.  If you do not have Cat 5e cable run in the walls, I'd try to use powerline adapters to extend your LAN through the house.  You MUST  be a Spectrum Internet customer to use the Roku as your "box".  It will only work when you are at home.  (i.e. - You cannnot take the Roku with you on vacation and expect to watch all your video programming while on the road.).  Another advantage of the Roku is that it will also do Netflix, Amazon Video, and other media app programming / streaming channels, such as FXNOW, HBOGo, etc.. 

 

The third option is to erect an antenna on the roof, and use good old OTA to receive standard broadcast television on the lesser used TV sets.  Something is better than nothing, and you will discover that the PQ from OTA is superior to the HD you get from the cable company or satellite.

 

You'll want home runs from your "media closet" to each television, and you'll want to use Quad-Shield RG-6 coax with compression F-connectors on the ends to improve signal strength and prevent ingress of interference from broadcast TV and cellular service.  This will become more of a problem after the winnners of the bandwidth auction begin using the same frequencies used by the cable companies...

 

Good luck!

 

 

Lead Moderator

Re: Snowy channels on HDTV connected to inner wall connection

Sorry to hear you are having trouble.

 

 

You mention you are using a 10 year old modem? Those can be swapped at any time, at no charge, at any of our store locations that handle equipment.  

 

 

Regards,
Julia R.
Spectrum-Social Media Customer Care
Lead Moderator-Community Forums

 

Expert

Re: Snowy channels on HDTV connected to inner wall connection

Need model #'s of the utility room device and whatever it attaches to in the attic.

If it is that old, it may have failed or cabling is bad... You don't get snowy pictures with digital Tv, , that's why I know you are on analog ones... And snow = failed amplifoier or splitters, they will need to be replaced to go to digital

'

 

need more info, or you'll need to get TWC/Spectrum out to replace/update what's bad... Don't blame them for not knowing what you have or how bad it is....