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Wi-Fi help

Hello,

I have spectrum service and do not pay for the wireless feature on the modem that comes with the internet. My smart hub is in a far corner of the house so WiFi from the hub is not optimal. I come off the back of the modem and go into a Linksys router. Internet is connected and standing next to the router I get 130 mbps download off the bat. I then plug in two lan lines into the back of the router, one runs to my desktop in the office upstairs the other runs to a TP link Wi-Fi access point located in a central part of my house. At that time Wi-Fi is speed tested and download speeds are 30-50 mbps. (All good). A few days pass, 3 other computers, a smart tv, 2-3 phones, a tablet, multiple chrome casts, and a google Home connect to the TP link. When streaming video through an app on the chrome cast, I get extreme interruption and buffering. A speed is performed and speed is 4-9 mbps at best. When the modem and router are reset the speeds improve for 3-4 days before dropping again.

A couple observations and questions:

1. Does Spectrum reduce your speed when multiple devices are connected?
2. The reduction in speeds seems to happen at high use times for the neighborhood. I.e. 6-10 pm.
3. Would the use of two different routers/access points cause a conflict in the wireless signal that is being broadcast throughout the house? It doesn’t seem to get better if I disable the WiFi broadcast from the router in the hub.
4. I switched to att uvesre for a year to check the difference. The same set up I have now would work well for a few devices, however with a max download of 15 mbps and multiple devices it was too slow for our house. 5. Any thoughts on how to improve the overall quality of my WiFi experience?
4 REPLIES
Participant

Re: Wi-Fi help

1.get faster internet

2. get a netgear R7800 X4S
Expert

Re: Wi-Fi help

put one on ch3 the other on ch9... see if that helps... They can't be on the same/overlapping channels.

And yeah, your speed is divided up by devices , worst yet,  wireless is set by the slowest device which is the weakest one.

.

 

Highlighted
Proven Sharer

Re: Wi-Fi help

Hard wire (ethernet) everything you possibly can.  If it doesn't fit in your pocket, use ethernet.  Keep as many devices as possible off the WiFi.

 

Use powerline ethernet adapters to make hard-wired connections, and deploy switches in locations where you have multiple devices.

Established Sharer

Re: Wi-Fi help


Jacobterrell wrote:
Hello,

...  << Background info deleted >>  ...

A couple observations and questions:

1. Does Spectrum reduce your speed when multiple devices are connected?
2. The reduction in speeds seems to happen at high use times for the neighborhood. I.e. 6-10 pm.
3. Would the use of two different routers/access points cause a conflict in the wireless signal that is being broadcast throughout the house? It doesn’t seem to get better if I disable the WiFi broadcast from the router in the hub.
4. I switched to att uvesre for a year to check the difference. The same set up I have now would work well for a few devices, however with a max download of 15 mbps and multiple devices it was too slow for our house.
5. Any thoughts on how to improve the overall quality of my WiFi experience?

Let's answer your questions in order:

1.  Does Spectrum reduce your speed when multiple devices are connected?

No, but they don't increase it either.  That is, you don't get the full 100 Mbps speed to EACH connected device, that is your TOTAL connection capacity which is shared among all WiFi and wired devices.

 

Some models of user-owned routers limit speed of individual connections to a percentage of the total.  And a few of those brands do so without clearly explaining it to the user.  So always remember that you are dividing your 100 Mbps just  like serving a pie for dessert: No matter how many slices you cut, the pie will never get any larger. 

And some of Spectrum's leased gateways normally limit you to about 15 simultaneous device connections.  When #16 shows up, #1 might be temorarily dropped, whether it is wired or WiFi.  You see the TV video stutter, but you don't notice your phone seamlessly moving off WiFi and back to your carrier.

 

2.  The reduction in speeds seems to happen at high use times for the neighborhood. I.e. 6-10 pm.

That is probably going to happen when your entire neighborhood is trying to consume their full internet bandwidth at the same time by streaming prime time evening HD video content or gaming intensively.  There's not enough network capacity for everyone to continuously pull  a full 100 Mbps through the shared cable "pipe."  If you are just keyboarding in short bursts by reading emails or Facebook postings, not streaming YouTube video or Hulu, there's enough peak system capacity.

 

3.  Would the use of two different routers/access points cause a conflict in the wireless signal that is being broadcast throughout the house? It doesn’t seem to get better if I disable the WiFi broadcast from the router in the hub.

Yes, multiple routers usually are set up incorrectly, cauing additional slowdowns.  Only one router should have its DHCP and NAT enabled, the other is jusrt an access point.   WiFi #2 needs to operate on different WiFi channnels in each band than WiFi#1 , but with the same SSID name in both APs.  Then your mobile devices can roam between them as you walk around the house.

 

4.  I switched to att uvesre for a year to check the difference. The same set up I have now would work well for a few devices, however with a max download of 15 mbps and multiple devices it was too slow for our house.

No surprise there, for all the reasons already listed.  You  learned that an internet connection is neither limitless nor free. 

 

5.  Any thoughts on how to improve the overall quality of my WiFi experience?

Don't rely on WiFi for your primary consumers of data, use wired 100 Mbps CAT-5e Fast Ethernet cabling instead.  Yes, we know sometimes users feel that is just not possible.  Powerline Ethernet adaptors can often eliminate installing CAT-5e hardwire. 

 

At the very least, set up all of your streaming video devices to use 5 GHz WiFi, because they need the higher bandwidth continuously.  The lighter usage stuff like smartphones should stay on 2.4 GHz, which talks further but at slower data rates and with more interference.  NOTE: Some video streaming providers suck up a lot more bandwidth than others, so choose carefully when you use more than one at a time.