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email hacked

Earlier this week there was no new email in my inbox.  Issue persisted and I contacted TWC by phone.  Very helpful tech guided me through a process to try to isolate the issue but was unsuccessful and escalated the problem to her seniors.  I received a voice mail saying that the problem was that I had set the email to forward to another account and the issue would be resolved by going into settings and disabling the forward function.  That worked but I have yet to hear how it is that the email was set to forward.  I didn't do it and the forwarding address was to an account @163.com  A google search indicates that 163.com is a Chinese ISP.  Still no response as to how someone was able to get into my account and activate the forward funtion.

3 REPLIES
Proven Sharer

Re: email hacked

1.  Virus - you downloaded something that sends private data elsewhere.

2.  Phishing email.  You answered a "verify your identity email" from a supposedly legit source, but was really a spoof.

3.  Social media (Facebook, LinkedIn).  They looked at your pictures / usernames and compiled a list of probable passwords.  (i.e. - you posted the MMDD of you birthday and something else, like your dog's name, and guessed that as your password, or the year of your birth or graduation date.)

4.  Your username / password for some other service was hacked, was posted to the darkweb, and criminals used that information to get into your email account, since they shared common usernames / passwords.  (i.e. - your LinkedIn username / password was stolen, and you use(d) the same combination for your email.)

 

I'd start changing all my other passwords, too, and start watching my credit report, because those who hijacked your email could have been changing mailing addresses for your banks / credit cards and started opeining up new lines of credit.

 

Use strong passwords that can't be guessed that include numbers and symbols.  Change them often.  Don't base them off personal identifiable information.

 

Do you know how long your email was being hi-jacked?

Trusted Helper

Re: email hacked


@dstoffa wrote:

1.  Virus - you downloaded something that sends private data elsewhere.

2.  Phishing email.  You answered a "verify your identity email" from a supposedly legit source, but was really a spoof.

3.  Social media (Facebook, LinkedIn).  They looked at your pictures / usernames and compiled a list of probable passwords.  (i.e. - you posted the MMDD of you birthday and something else, like your dog's name, and guessed that as your password, or the year of your birth or graduation date.)

4.  Your username / password for some other service was hacked, was posted to the darkweb, and criminals used that information to get into your email account, since they shared common usernames / passwords.  (i.e. - your LinkedIn username / password was stolen, and you use(d) the same combination for your email.)

 

I'd start changing all my other passwords, too, and start watching my credit report, because those who hijacked your email could have been changing mailing addresses for your banks / credit cards and started opeining up new lines of credit.

 

Use strong passwords that can't be guessed that include numbers and symbols.  Change them often.  Don't base them off personal identifiable information.

 

Do you know how long your email was being hi-jacked?


Great advice,

 

In addition to the above recommendations, I know it is a PITA to change a bunch of passwords, but in this case it may be needed.  Also update your Anti-Virus software and run a full scan.

 

1.) Get Malware Bytes.  You can turn off real-time protection and should, so that it doesn't interfere with your other AV.  Run a scan with that.  (This is a second line of defense.  You can run this as a precaution about once a month on demand.)

 

https://www.malwarebytes.com/mwb-download/thankyou/

 

2.) Contact your bank and credit card company and say that you suspect that you were a victim of computer identity theft.  Any other financial institutions as well.  Ask them to put a "watch" on your accounts.

 

3.) Have your bank (or credit card company) send you a new credit card.  Activate that card, and destroy the old one immediately after activating the new card.

 

Satch

Not applicable

Re: email hacked

It may also be an error in the programming and there was no malicious intent in the name fields being filled out incorrectly with someone elses name.