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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

Business class customers can get static IP addresses, residential customers only get a DHCP address.  I have a "modem only" box, and have defined the DHCP range in my router to use final octet values of 100-250, so I have plenty of available  addresses for local static IP addresses.  I'm only using 5 statics right now (printers and an access point, plus the router), and the typical number of dynamic addresses assigned runs from 8 to 20.

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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

Im just using ther reserve option under DHCP for local "statics" in that they wont change since they are reserved.

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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

Your network stability after a modem reset or power outage & recovery will improve if you program a fixed IP into those devices, instead of reserving one for each MAC address.  This is especially true for WiFi networked printers that go to sleep [and drop the IP connection] shortly after printing or scanning a document.  All fixed IPs must be outside the router's DHCP range, of course. 

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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

also shouldn't be using .2 to .10....

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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

Yup, since he did say he was using an Apple Mac.

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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

No apples, no macs.   Just windows and ubuntu.

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Re: Need help with Model:TC8717T

drool wrote: who has any static ips?  I have local reserved addresses in the DHCP range.

 

Six of one, half a dozen of the other.  Ms. Raye is speaking from being informed via the old ways, when routers did not always have the option for reserved addresses, and you HAD to set static IP at the individual devices.  Routers sometimes had static IP lists as well, but it wasn't local reserved in DHCP, until the more recent lines of routers.  Setting local reserved addresses in the DHCP range is actually a better way, inasmuch as you can use that router page as a central console for all your IP assignments, and keep track easier.

 

If you want, you can also set static IP at the device, to match the reserved address you made in the router.  You shouldn't have to, but there are probably still a few older devices (like old printers) that need to have static IP set in the device no matter how the router is set.  There is also some old commercial software that requires a static IP, but that's outside the scope of your home network issue.

 

I'm not sure what Ms. Raye is referring to regarding accessing the modem via the router address (192.168.0.1).  The 16-channel gateways (combo modem/routers) from TWC/Spectrum I have seen all access the same pages by logging in through both the modem or the router address.... 192.168.100.1 or 192.168.0.1.  Some have a second login password for entering the specific wireless router config pages accessed from the tabs on the main page, others don't.