7 REPLIES
Spectrum Employee

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

CableCards cost $2/mo where I am.  The FCC requires carriers like TWC to offer them if asked.

Refer to this document for your specific city/town region that you live in:
http://www.timewarnercable.com/en/support/account-and-billing/topics/retail-rates.html
(note: retail rates are often discounted by packages/campaigns that bundle services)

My postings on this site are my own, off-the-clock, and don’t necessarily represent TWC’s/Charter's strategies or opinions.
Spectrum Employee

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?


DelMarPiP wrote:

i read somewhere the tivo bolt has a tuning adapter built in but no 1 knows it does so twc fools u into payin for it


DelMarPiP,

 

I don't work with the billing system, but I'm fairly certain we don't charge for tuning adapters...?

Seasoned Contributor

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

i read somewhere the tivo bolt has a tuning adapter built in but no 1 knows it does so twc fools u into payin for it

Lead Moderator

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

Ditzman631  You can use On Demand through TWCTV on several devices.

 

The TWC TV® app is available on these platforms: Apple iOS, Android™, Kindle Fire & HDX, PC/MAC, ROKU®, Xbox 360®, Xbox One™, and Samsung Smart TVs.

 

I find myself using On Demand far more than anything else. Don't think Ive watched a live program in months!

 

 

Regards,
Julia R.
TWC-Social Media Customer Care
Moderator - TWC Community Forums

Newcomer

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

I just hooked up my TiVo bolt last night. Took about an hour and a half to two hours total. That's going from opening the box to everything working.

I ordered my cable card (and tuning adapter) yesterday and picked it up from the local twc store on the way home from work. You will need both to use the bolt.

I followed the twc instructions to hook up the tuning adapter first then the TiVo bold setup instructions. Was very easy, about 10-15 minutes.

Plugged in the bolt and answered a few questions. It did some updates an then came up with a screen that said I needed to call twc and activate my cable card. It even gave me the number. Was on the phone for a it 20-30 minutes and they got everything working.
Went to TiVo website and signed up and the TiVo went through some updates. This takes the longest.
I don't remember the two individuals I talked to on twc support but they were both friendly and helpful. Both seemed to know what they were doing.

The bolt has a much better interface than the twc DVR. Only thing I will miss is on demand stuff.

Hope this helps.
Rob
Contributor

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

I have a TiVo Bolt. Currently I am using it with an Antennas Direct Clearstream 2V to get OTA channels. I am currently paying $175/month for cable & Internet (standard tier). My TWC DVR is a Samsung SMT-H3090 & I have no premium channels. I've never used the TWC remote (I use my Logitech Harmony Elite) . I own my cable modem a bridged SBG6580 and router Linksys WRT1900ACS. I subscribe to netflix and am an Amazon prime member. Seems like dumping the costly equipment charges would cut my TWC monthly bill substantially. 

Spectrum Employee

Re: Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

Keep in mind if things are working people don't tend communicate.

 

You see the issues, not the many more cases of things working without problems.

 

The customer experience forum is a prime example of this, very rarely do people bother to compliment something positive, 90% of it is venting complaints.

 

 

So in short, not particularly complicated no.  But a decoder CableCARD is required.

Did you have a specific question about how to get a TiVo working /w TWC?

 

 


The CableCARD (a decoder component essentially) is what is needed.
If the local TWC store in your area doesn't carry it, then you can get one mailed to you by "EZ Connect Self-Install" (basically FedEx or UPS).

If the EZ Connect attempt fails, you can have a "rescue" then sent.

Here's some detail information on cable cards, if you want to know more:

Spoiler

 A CableCARD is a plug-in device, the size of a credit card, which enables you to view and record cable or satellite programming on digital video recorders, personal computers, and televisions without the use of a set top or converter box.  The CableCARD provides you with direct access to digital and analog programming, HD (High-Definition), and subscription to premium channels like HBO, Cinemax, STARZ, and more.

There are two types of Digital Cable ready devices that use CableCARDs: One-way Devices (UDCP or Unidirectional Digital Cable Products) and Two-way Devices (Tru2Way® Devices).

  • Unidirectional Digital Cable Products or UDCPs are one-way only devices.  Most CableCARD-compatible TVs and CableCARD-compatible devices like TiVo DVRs are UDCPs.  UDCPs are able to get one-way analog and Digital Cable services, including some HD and premium offerings.  UDCPs cannot access any two-way services, such as, On Demand programming, On-screen program guides, Pay-Per-View services, Interactive services such as Start Over®, Look Back® and Caller ID on TV.  Also, channels that are delivered using Switched Digital Video technology will require a tuning adaptor or other device to tune into those additional channels.
  • Tru2way devices when used with a cable or satellite provider's CableCARD, will allow access to additional services that require a two way connection.  Tru2Way TVs have only launched in a very few limited markets and TWC does support this technology.

Cable and Satellite companies have a protective format called Conditional Access (CA, aka QAM) security which basically prevents customers and non-subscribers from stealing cable and satellite TV broadcasts.  The CableCARD is a small code-smart device that eliminates the need for a set-top box.  The CableCARD plugs into a digital cable-ready television set or other digital device like a TiVo or Moxi and, like a set-top box, allows consumers to access unscrambled cable television signals and scrambled digital cable and satellite television services.

CableCARDs have a storage capacity to keep records on subscriber information and contains certain codes to unlock and view digital cable signals that have been scrambled.  It does not permit two-way interactive functions.  The card serves as the solution for Conditional Access (CA) security and will "pass" the appropriate set of programming services to the cable or satellite customer based upon their specific subscription.

TiVo CableCARD Identification

  • S-cards refer to the Single-Stream CableCARD, or first generation version of CableCARDs.
    • NOTE: S-cards are no longer in production by the manufacturers, so going forward most cards offered will be the M-card variety.
  • M-cards refer to the Multi-Stream, or the second generation of CableCARDs.
    • TiVo series 3 and above use M-Cards. 

What is the TiVo model you own specifically out of curiosity?

 

My postings on this site are my own, off-the-clock, and don’t necessarily represent TWC’s/Charter's strategies or opinions.
Rob
Contributor

Is getting TiVo functioning really that hard?

Reading through the posts hear it seems to be a hit or miss process getting TiVo functioning. I would really like to return my Samsung dvr, my twc remote and cancel my dvr service but would like to know I don't need to go back if getting my tivo bolt working. I am pretty electronic savy so working through little issues is ok. Ijust don't want to have to reobtain a TWC box again if I cant get it working.